Tag: writing advice

The Stuff In Between The Dialogue.

Though we don’t usually need a lot going on outside the dialogue itself, it often feels static or otherwise unnatural if you have a entire conversation with dialogue, a few tags, and nothing else. But we never want to add extra words for the… Continue Reading “The Stuff In Between The Dialogue.”

Every scene furthers the plot.

Some writers confuse “you must further the plot with every scene” with “heavy plot handling must happen constantly.” (Which is a shame, because the latter is not only incorrect, but can make your character’s interactions stiff and boring.) It’s okay to let your characters… Continue Reading “Every scene furthers the plot.”

Writing Your First Novel Right.

While I have a book published (siren! pirates! okay yeah enough with the marketing), I’m still editing the first novel I wrote. It’s okay if your first novel takes a long time. It’s okay if you have to rewrite it and rewrite it and then thoroughly edit… Continue Reading “Writing Your First Novel Right.”

Writing Relationships: Enemies to Lovers.

These types of relationships can be some of the most interesting and enjoyable, both to read and write, because they show us many sides of the same characters and the growth from a hatred to mixed feelings and finally to genuine love and acceptance… Continue Reading “Writing Relationships: Enemies to Lovers.”

Writing Redemption Arcs.

What is a redemption arc? “Redemption: An act of redeeming or atoning for a fault or mistake.” An act, implying action, which is created by choices, which just happens to be the basis of character development. Some writers confuse redemption arcs with things they are not, and… Continue Reading “Writing Redemption Arcs.”

Why is passive voice (and past progressive tense) “bad”?

First off, I have to put a disclaimer here because I tend to rope past progressive tense into passive voice, because they both rely on “to be” verbs a lot, and because I’m lazy. I’ll talk about them both separately for once. 1. Passive… Continue Reading “Why is passive voice (and past progressive tense) “bad”?”

Mary Sue Stories: Why your Mary Sue and Gary Stu should(n’t always) go.

Most of us are quite familiar with the term, but if you’ve heard it passed around without a proper definition, a Mary Sue is a (traditionally female) character who’s known for being flawless. She’s powerful, beautiful, intelligent, more skilled than her peers, gets herself out of every bad… Continue Reading “Mary Sue Stories: Why your Mary Sue and Gary Stu should(n’t always) go.”

A Look at Negative Character Development.

What is negative character development? It’s incredibly hard to define. Some writers relate it to moral decline. Some apply it to areas where a character returns to a way of life they had at one point developed out of. Other writers don’t like to… Continue Reading “A Look at Negative Character Development.”

Describing Nature

(Tips to help you tackle the outdoors without ever leaving your home.) The forest for the trees. When describing any setting, especially potentially spacious settings such as expanses of nature, you have two major components: the big picture (the forest) and the little picture… Continue Reading “Describing Nature”

Writing Engaging Antagonists

Before we get started, I want to clarify two things: – Antagonists can be of any moral alignment. They can be also be non-human things, such as monsters, nature, inner demons, etc. The antagonist is simply the primary thing your protagonist fights against. –… Continue Reading “Writing Engaging Antagonists”