Tag: writing tips

Fighting Writer’s Block 101

I have various motivational tips and things in this tag, so I’ll keep this to the basics. It depends a lot on what kind of writers block you’re having. “I can’t figure out what happens next.” Take a break, breathe, and outline. Even if you’re… Continue Reading “Fighting Writer’s Block 101”

How to Staying Motivated While You Write: On the days you want to give up.

This is a very simple question in that I have answered before, and yet a very hard one because the way I stay motivated isn’t going to work for everyone. How do I, Bryn, stay motivated? Flexible outlines. I have a lovely outline that tells me I have so… Continue Reading “How to Staying Motivated While You Write: On the days you want to give up.”

What not to (not) write in fantasy.

I’ve seen some posts going around on what not to write in fantasy, many of which amount to: Don’t write evil kings. Don’t write people who are evil for the sake of evil. Don’t write bullies. Don’t write villains at all actually. Don’t write mentors. Don’t… Continue Reading “What not to (not) write in fantasy.”

The Stuff In Between The Dialogue.

Though we don’t usually need a lot going on outside the dialogue itself, it often feels static or otherwise unnatural if you have a entire conversation with dialogue, a few tags, and nothing else. But we never want to add extra words for the… Continue Reading “The Stuff In Between The Dialogue.”

Writing Relationships: Enemies to Lovers.

These types of relationships can be some of the most interesting and enjoyable, both to read and write, because they show us many sides of the same characters and the growth from a hatred to mixed feelings and finally to genuine love and acceptance… Continue Reading “Writing Relationships: Enemies to Lovers.”

Making your angst hurt: the power of lighthearted scenes. 

I’m incredibly disappointed with the trend in stories (especially ‘edgy’ YA novels) to bombard the reader with traumatic situations, angry characters, and relationship drama without ever first giving them a reason to root for a better future. As a reader… I might care that… Continue Reading “Making your angst hurt: the power of lighthearted scenes. “

Writing Redemption Arcs.

What is a redemption arc? “Redemption: An act of redeeming or atoning for a fault or mistake.” An act, implying action, which is created by choices, which just happens to be the basis of character development. Some writers confuse redemption arcs with things they are not, and… Continue Reading “Writing Redemption Arcs.”

Plotting a Story: Filling in the gaps.

When you struggle to connect the main plot points. Fore word: This is how I do the thing. It’s not the only way to do the thing, nor the “right way,” just one way, which happens to work really well for me. I hope it… Continue Reading “Plotting a Story: Filling in the gaps.”

Why is passive voice (and past progressive tense) “bad”?

First off, I have to put a disclaimer here because I tend to rope past progressive tense into passive voice, because they both rely on “to be” verbs a lot, and because I’m lazy. I’ll talk about them both separately for once. 1. Passive… Continue Reading “Why is passive voice (and past progressive tense) “bad”?”

Mary Sue Stories: Why your Mary Sue and Gary Stu should(n’t always) go.

Most of us are quite familiar with the term, but if you’ve heard it passed around without a proper definition, a Mary Sue is a (traditionally female) character who’s known for being flawless. She’s powerful, beautiful, intelligent, more skilled than her peers, gets herself out of every bad… Continue Reading “Mary Sue Stories: Why your Mary Sue and Gary Stu should(n’t always) go.”